Australian Ninja Warrior contestants are not drug tested, production company confirms

HAVING an unpaid parking ticket is enough to rule you out of Ninja Warrior but would-be ninjas are not tested for drugs prior to running the gauntlet.

The tough, obstacle course-style reality television show that originated in Japan has taken Australia by storm in its debut series here but it has emerged contestants are not drug tested either before or during filming.

There is no suggestion, however, that anyone taking part in the competition, or pictured in this article, is on drugs.

Australian Ninja Warrior contestant Katie Williams takes on one of the many obstacles. Picture: Supplied

Australian Ninja Warrior contestant Katie Williams takes on one of the many obstacles. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

A spokesperson for the production company behind the Australian version, Endemol Shine, told news.com.au while extensive background tests were undertaken, drug tests were not, leaving the door open for steroid-filled gym junkies to compete against those who avoid the muscle-building compound.

“All competitors on Australian Ninja Warrior are subject to thorough assessment prior to taking part, but no drug testing is conducted,” the spokesperson said.

Tim Robards. Picture: Channel 9

Tim Robards. Picture: Channel 9Source:Supplied

The former Bachelor Tim Robards tried his luck on the Ninja course. Picture: Channel 9

The former Bachelor Tim Robards tried his luck on the Ninja course. Picture: Channel 9Source:Supplied

A person claiming to be a five-time contestant on the American series in an online discussion thread, said US participants were also not drug tested.

“They do not test for drugs but they do conduct a pretty thorough background check and medical evaluation should you make it past the semi finals,” he said.

“Having things like unpaid tickets or some sort of criminal history could affect your chances as well.”

Joelene Kelly competes.

Joelene Kelly competes.Source:Herald Sun

Rory Rhodes.

Rory Rhodes.Source:Supplied

Steroid use is illegal in Australia but it is widely used and readily available among gym goers.

Whether or not being on the drug would aid competitors, however, is up for discussion.

While the obstacle course is strength related, it is also heavily reliant upon agility, which could make it more difficult for steroid-fuelled, muscle bound men and women, due to their increased size and weight.

The show, which airs in Australia on the Nine Network, has been described as “a certified phenomenon”, going from strength-to-strength (pun intended) in the ratings.

A massive audience of 1.758 million viewers tuned in on Sunday night.

By comparison, the one-time Australian reality television powerhouse, Ten’s MasterChef, reached 806,000 viewers on Sunday night.

[Source”cnbc”]

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