Navy Wraps Up Pacific Excercise

Navy Wraps Up Pacific Excercise

STAFF

08/06/2016

The world’s largest international maritime exercise took place in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California with 26 nations, 45 ships, five submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel participating.

By LTALL, United States Navy

“Capable, Adaptive, Partners” was the theme of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016 exercise which concluded Aug. 4, after more than a month of training events.

The world’s largest international maritime exercise took place in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California with 26 nations, 45 ships, five submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel participating.

 

 

Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) transits in close formation as one of 40 ships and submarines representing 13 international partner nations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume/Released)Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) transits in close formation as one of 40 ships and submarines representing 13 international partner nations during Rim of the Pacific 2016.  (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume/Released)

 

RIMPAC provided a unique training opportunity that helped participants foster and sustain cooperative relationships critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans.

Sailors man the rails aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) as the ship enters Pearl Harbor during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Tomas Compian)Sailors man the rails aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) as the ship enters Pearl Harbor during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Tomas Compian)

Explosive ordnance disposal technicians assigned to Commander, Task Unit 177.2.1 from the Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center, retrieve an inert mine during a mine-hunting exercise in support of the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Bryan Jackson/Released)Explosive ordnance disposal technicians assigned to Commander, Task Unit 177.2.1 from the Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center, retrieve an inert mine during a mine-hunting exercise in support of the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Bryan Jackson/Released)

 

Hosted by U.S. Pacific Fleet, RIMPAC 2016 was led by U.S. Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, commander of the U.S. 3rd Fleet, who served as the combined task force commander. “RIMPAC 2016 was an unqualified success,” saidTyson. “The collaboration and cohesiveness between participants proved that we can operate effectively with our partner nations and that we will be ready in the Pacific if or when we’re called upon. We operated as an effective team while simultaneously strengthening the skills of each and every participant. To safely and effectively execute an exercise of this scale and scope is a tribute to the leadership and skill of every participating unit. I could not be more proud of everyone who took part, and I value the friendships that we built.”

The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) conducts flight operations near the island of Hawaii. America is underway conducting maritime exercises with partner nations for Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan Riley/Released)The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) conducts flight operations near the island of Hawaii. America is underway conducting maritime exercises with partner nations for Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan Riley/Released)

An EA-18G Growler assigned to the Wizards of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 133 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jake Greenberg/Released)An EA-18G Growler assigned to the Wizards of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 133 launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jake Greenberg/Released)

 

Tyson said the involvement of so many different countries working together to successfully accomplish RIMPAC was a strong reminder of the unity coalition forces can exhibit in a real-world situation.

Landing Craft, Air Cushion 44, assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU 5), approaches the well deck of amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during the final amphibious assault of Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac)Landing Craft, Air Cushion 44, assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU 5), approaches the well deck of amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) during the final amphibious assault of Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joseph M. Buliavac)

The nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) conducts helicopter operations at sunset during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jason Noble)The nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) conducts helicopter operations at sunset during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jason Noble)

 

“From the beginning harbor phase to the closing ceremony reception, the different nations have demonstrated their capability and proven themselves to be very adaptive during the entire exercise,” said Tyson. “It’s all about our working together and becoming better partners and understanding how we work together in different scenarios. We’ve certainly accomplished what we set out to with RIMPAC and proven that we’re stronger as allies because of it.”

Sailors stationed on littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) test twin-boom expandable crane operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Second Class Michaela Garrison/Released)Sailors stationed on littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) test twin-boom expandable crane operations during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Second Class Michaela Garrison/Released)

 

This year’s RIMPAC marked the 25th in the series, which began in 1971. The exercise held every two years.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Excercise, socialize and hunt Pokemon

A warning reminding people to stay safe while playing Pokemon Go.

The Pokemon Go map which uses GPS to detect a player’s location.

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A Pokemon — Pidgeotto — being captured.

There is a new craze currently sweeping the globe.

It has nothing to do with protests or tragedy. There are no diseases or mysterious illnesses associated with it and for the most part, it will not cause harm to any of the people participating in its adventures.

It does not cause depression, in fact, it is having quite the opposite effect on its players becoming something of a bright spot in a world so filled with negativity.

The game is Pokemon Go, a free-to-play location-based augmented reality game.

The Pokemon Company has been around for a little more than 20 years, since its origin as a Japanese consortium with characters originally called Pocket Monsters or simply Pokemon for short. Although its popularity waned, it never went away completely.

Pokemon Go has resurrected the popular franchise and has done it seemingly overnight.

The game — released July 6 — has been downloaded somewhere between 10-50 million times according to its Google Play store page and that is only counting Android users in the U.S. It currently has 11 million active daily users.

The game uses the camera, GPS and clock on a player’s phone. The GPS and clock allow a player’s phone to detect where that player is in the real world and at what time. The virtual creatures will appear for the player to catch them and which Pokemon pops up is dependent on the player’s position and the time of day.

It has been hugely popular with teenagers and adults alike in Altus with meet-ups happening around the city park and in various other locations.

There are PokeStops — notable locations in town — where players can go to collect additional Poke balls and eggs that can hatch into full Pokemon as well as gyms where players can go to battle other players for Team Instinct, Mystic or Valor supremacy.

However, the game has contributed more to the gaming community so far than just another fun hand-held game to play. It turns out, players are getting exercise and making friends.

“It has gotten me more active and I have actually been using my stroller for my daughter,” said player Gabby Shelton. “It has been a great way to make friends and it’s a relief to be more open with my hobby of playing Pokemon. Every now and then I do see people actually pick up litter. I’m pretty sure I’ve made more new friends this way than I have in the past three or so years.”

These sentiments have been echoed by many of its players.

”It has brought my family and I closer,” said Mike Hocker. “I have two kids — a five-year-old daughter and 10-month-old son — and a wife. We like to go to the park when it’s nice and cool and walk around for about an hour. It gives us great exercise and gives me a better connection with my family because I work a lot and so I barely have any time to get to enjoy being around them and this game has helped us get out of the house and do things as a family.”

Because of how the game is built to be played, players cannot catch a variety of Pokemon from one location. The game requires the player to get outside and walk, with some participants walking many miles a day to find their next big Pokemon.

It gets gamers off of their couches and into the world. It has provided exercise to so many without ever actually feeling like exercise.

Players have become active again and have come together in large groups, using the game as a bonding experience. Many people enjoy it because it has given them more things to do around Altus in the summer months.

However, it is also very important to shed light on the very real dangers faced by players.

Just recently in Missouri, a group of people used a “lure” item to bring people to their location and then they robbed them.

Players should also never drive while playing and always watch out where they are walking. It is a game and should be treated as such. Players should never lose focus of their surroundings.

Whether somebody wants to download the game and play it for the exercise, social experience, nostalgia or just to see what the hype is all about, Pokemon Go is for everybody.

The Pokemon Go Altus OK Facebook group of Altus is planning an event July 23. Look them up for more information.

Reach Ryan Lewis at 580-482-1221, ext. 2076.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

One Minute of Exercise May Be All You Need

Researchers find short bursts of high-intensity exercise are as good as spending up to an hour riding a bike or running.

Researchers find short bursts of high-intensity exercise are as good as spending up to an hour riding a bike or running.

There is good news for people who think they do not have time to exercise.

A group of researchers from a university in Canada recently published a study that says short bursts of high-intensity exercise are good for you.

In fact, this kind of exercise is just as good as spending up to an hour riding a bike or running steadily.

The research team followed 27 men who were not very active for 12 weeks. They divided the men into three groups. One group did short, intense workouts on a bicycle three times a week. Another group rode a bicycle for about 50 minutes, three times a week. A third group did nothing.

The researchers found something they did not expect. The group that exercised for only 10 minutes each session was just as healthy after 12 weeks as the group that exercised for 50 minutes each session.

That is because of the way the researchers organized the workouts.

Each group started with a two-minute warm-up and finished with a three-minute cool-down. But in-between, the high-intensity group sprinted for 20 seconds, followed by a two-minute recovery period. They did three sprints for a total of 10 minutes of exercise. This kind of exercise is known as interval training.

The lead author of the study says interval training is both time efficient and effective.

I’m Dan Friedell.

Dan Friedell adapted this story for Learning English based on a report from VOANews.com. Mario Ritter was the editor.

Can you find 12 minutes in your busy schedule for exercise? We want to know. Write to us in the Comments Section or on our Facebook page.

__________________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

burst – n. a short period of producing or doing something that begins suddenly

session – n. a period of time that is used to do a particular activity

interval – n. a period of time between events

efficient – adj. capable of producing desired results without wasting materials, time, or energy

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

An exercise in futility: Rangers’ silent bats, offensive woes have put them on the offseason’s doorstep

Staff Photographer

Texas Rangers right fielder Nomar Mazara (30) is called out on strikes in the second inning during the Toronto Blue Jays vs. the Texas Rangers major league baseball ALDS Game 2 at Globe Life Park in Arlington,Texas on Friday, October 7, 2016. (Louis DeLuca/The Dallas Morning News)

By Evan Grant, Staff Writer

ARLINGTON — Rougned Odor spoke for the Rangers offense.

Odor said nothing at all.

And that said it all.

The Rangers have done nothing offensively in the first two games of the Division Series and have fallen to the precipice of elimination. On Friday, they managed to grind 13 hits and 16 base runners into a pile of pulp in losing 5-3 to Toronto. They did, however, set a club postseason record. For futility. They left 13 runners stranded, eclipsing the mark they set in Game 6 of the 2011 World Series. And, that didn’t work out all that well either.

Odor got the Rangers started on the way to the record, bouncing out with two runners on to end the first inning. He also came to the plate in the ninth inning as the potential tying run and struck out against Roberto Osuna and — dare we say it? — was overpowered by a 96 mph Osuna fastball down the middle.

So, afterward, he sat hunched over at his locker, thumbing through his phone with a scowl on his face. He declined to discuss his performance, leaving it to more experienced players to explain the wasted chances.

“We had plenty of chances to score some runs, and we didn’t come through,” Adrian Beltre said. “Almost every inning we had two men on base, guys in scoring position. We couldn’t find a way to get them in. We got a couple hits but not enough.”

A couple? They got 13. Only twice before have they had more in a postseason game. But only three were for extra bases, and all three of them with nobody on. They had 18 at-bats with runners in scoring position, tied for the most they’ve ever had in a postseason game, and managed just a pair of singles.

Here’s the thing: It’s not just a game; it’s a trend.

The Rangers didn’t have many opportunities in the series opener, but are now 4 for 36 with runners in scoring position against Toronto in losing five consecutive playoff games over the last two seasons.

“We are not getting the hits to keep the rallies going,” Carlos Beltran said.

Beltran was as guilty as anybody. He entered the game with 10 hits, including three homers, in 32 career at-bats (.313) against Toronto’s J.A. Happ. He came to the plate in the fourth with a run already in following three consecutive two-out singles. He promptly bounced out to first. He also struck out against Osuna to end the eighth with a man on base.

A home run would have tied the game. The same could be said about Odor’s at-bat in the ninth. Perhaps that is where one of the Rangers’ issues lies. The home run has become null in their postseason offense. Toronto, meanwhile, has churned out walks and homers.

The Jays’ first runs Friday came on a home run by Troy Tulowitzki after a walk of Jose Bautista. It was the first of four homers. In the teams’ last five postseason meetings, the Blue Jays have 19 walks and 12 home runs. The Rangers have 12 runs and one homer. Toronto has won all five games.

Perhaps it was telling that before the series started, Rangers general manager Jon Daniels was asked how important it was to be able to manufacture runs in the postseason.

He responded by pointing out that Toronto had scored all its runs in the wild-card game on homers.

“I think home runs win games,” he said.

The lack of them — and of any discernible offense — puts the Rangers on the verge of losing a series. Again.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Exercising in virtual reality with the VirZoom motion controller

Video games and exercise don’t play well together. Sure, there’s the eight-year-old Wii Fit, drumming with the new Rock Band, and a slew of dedicated exercise games using Microsoft’s Kinect and featuring fitness trainers you’ve never heard of. But video games are more often a sedentary activity, asking only that you stretch occasionally and go to the bathroom in between long stretches of sitting.

Then there’s the VirZoom, a strange accessory for virtual reality headsets like the Oculus Rift and PlayStation VR. If VirZoom looks like an exercise bike, that’s because it is. The Boston-based company gets its bikes from a Chinese manufacturer and transforms them with sensors and software into a virtual reality motion controller that plugs into a PlayStation 4 or PC.

As usual, donning a headset plants you in a 360-degree virtual environment. But instead of a gamepad or motion controller, the VirZoom powers your movement through pedaling. Pedal harder on the bike, and you’ll move faster through a game. Think of it as SoulCycle for the couch-loving gamer.

VirZoom’s previous prototypes were actual bicycles, which meant you had to turn the handlebars to move inside the game. That turned out to be terrifying because users were incapable of seeing their hands or orienting their body in real space. VirZoom resolved the issue by fixing the handlebars in place, while motion-sensing tech like Sony’s PlayStation Camera now tracks your head movements instead. That allows you to turn by leaning your shoulders left and right in gradual or more dramatic fashion. The handlebars also contain buttons and triggers to interact with in-game objects.

After five minutes on the VirZoom last week wearing the latest version of PlayStation VR — Sony’s dedicated headset, due out sometime next year — I could feel sweat collecting on my forehead and my heart rate was noticeably in the triple digits. Thanks to Sony’s most recent ergonomic choices, this version of PlayStation VR, which we’re told is very close to the consumer version, has a cushier forehead piece. The goggles also slide forward and backward to your liking without the need to strap them as close to your face as possible. So while you may not deal with dripping sweat while playing, exercising in VR can still be an uncomfortable activity requiring a nearby towel.

The games are not that great, and there’s no getting around that. The three titles I tried firsthand amounted to mini-games you’d more likely find in an older arcade: capturing bandits while riding a horse and swinging a lasso; collecting coins in mid-air while flying through a canyon on a winged Pegasus; and racing cars. What’s fascinating, however, is how the VirZoom can take those subpar experiences and elevate them to something exhilarating, with complex sensations you’ll only to find replicated by a modern-day 3D theme park ride.

By mixing in-game motion with real-world movement, the result is an experience that’s more about immediate physical responses than it is about feeling teleported to a different world. Your eyes may not be tricked by the so-so graphics, but your body will certainly be screaming at your brain, telling it that you are in fact moving. Of course, the VirZoom did bring me right up against my discomfort threshold. But it never surpassed it.

I admit to having felt disoriented during the demos. It was difficult, for example, to reconcile falling through the air with the physical motion of pedaling the bike. Before I would touch the ground while riding the flying Pegasus, I couldn’t stop myself from bracing for an impact I would never feel. I would not recommend the VirZoom to those who feel motion sickness easily, but if you can read while riding in a moving vehicle, you’re probably okay.

“We’re trying to solve the problem of locomotion in VR,” says Spencer Honeyman, VirZoom’s director of business development. And it’s a hard problem — perhaps the problem keeping VR from being more immersive than it is today beyond graphical improvements.

VIRZOOM IS MORE ABOUT PHYSICAL RESPONSES THAN IT IS ABOUT FEELING TELEPORTED

Most VR motion controllers are trying to translate real-life hand movements directly to in-game characters, like the rotation of a wrist or the raising of an arm. That typically requires controllers in your hand, but there’s little by way of full body controllers without being strapped into what looks like a low-key exoskeleton. Even worse, without a large carpeted space free of sharp objects, it’s not advisable to free roam with a VR headset on. The VirZoom manages to get us moving in VR in a way that feels more useful than bumbling around your living room.

VirZoom is selling its bike starting in the first half of next year for $250, but the first 300 customers who preorder it starting today will pay $200, the company tells The Verge. The package includes five VirZoom games and a free month of the company’s $10 per month annual subscription service, which offers fitness tracking software and updates to current and new games down the line.

Once it launches, the biggest issue the company will face is the chicken-or-the-egg problem. VirZoom games are all made by the company itself for now, but they’re opening up the platform, letting other developers design games to work the VirZoom. Without those developers making better games optimized for VirZoom’s motion controller, though, it may not attract that many customers. Without customers, developers may focus only on handheld motion controllers like Oculus Touch and forgo VirZoom.

But for those looking for a way to exercise in a virtual world, the VirZoom is only fully realized product out there right now. And with a price tag only marginally higher than a standard exercise bike, you can finally workout in your living room without feeling like a shut-in. After all, your body may be at home, but your mind will be somewhere else entirely.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

NPP man stabbed in vote-transfer excercise at W/R

Reports have been made of a member of the NPP’s “Zongo for Change” group, Habib Lukeman, stabbed in the Sekondi constituency of the Western region during the voter-transfer exercise.

StarrFMonline alleges that Habib was stabbed by some NDC thugs following a disagreement over the vote-transfer exercise.

Meanwhile, coordinator for the “Zongo for Change” group, Omar Hamza claims Lukeman has been rushed to the Effia-Nkwanta Regional hospital after the attack and currently responding to intensive treatment.

The troubling development follows the immediate closure of the EC office in Tamale after some rebels were seen firing warning shots amidst the ongoing voter transfer exercise there.

READ ALSO: EC office closed after rebels fire warning shots

READ ALSO: Stop everything you are doing, the Kalyppo craze just got crazier

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

JBLM soldier shoots helicopter during training excercise

© 2016 Cox Media Group.

Authorities say a soldier from Joint Base Lewis-McChord who was participating in a large training exercise in California shot an Army Apache helicopter with live rounds.

The News Tribune reports the infantryman’s bullets punctured the JBLM-based helicopter four times Saturday, prompting the exercise at the National Training Center to be halted.

Training center spokesman Ken Drylie says no one was injured and it’s unclear why the soldier had live rounds in his rifle.

Soldiers are given blanks to use in mock battles when they arrive at the center.

Drylie says the U.S. Army conducted a preliminary investigation and determined the shooting was an accident.

The force at the training center is JBLM’s 1st Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division. It’s a Stryker brigade being tested to see whether it’s ready for deployments.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Endorses Excercise During Pregnancy*

 

Meet someone who has been admired by many for her consistency and focus in exercise, but more recently for heightening awareness of the benefits of exercise, prior to, during and post pregnancy. Her name is Daniella Tarouba.

Together with her personal trainer Michel Andre Le Blanc, Tarouba maintained her fitness routine quite comfortably upon becoming pregnant with her second child. The volume of work she was capable of doing was nothing short of remarkable, and it was plain to see she felt comfortable and enjoyed every moment of her training. She became a gym favourite to look at during her training, a motivation to all.
On October 19, approximately two weeks ago, Tarouba gave birth to her daughter, Anabel Antonia Tarouba. She messaged me two days after delivery writing, “I was admitted at 6.13 a.m. and baby was born at 6.25am.

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Safety experts recommend that children face to the rear in their car seat until they are 2 years old
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A good car seat can be passed down for generations and still be perfectly safe 10 years after buying it
Thumb sucking is a normal behavior for infants, though most stop around two years old
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EVENTS Research Presentation on Nov 22: The Effects of Nature & Exercise on Student Learning and Affect

All are invited to the research presentation “The Effects of Nature & Exercise on Student Learning and Affect” on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 from 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. in Walters Hall Room 100. 

This session will present research in an emerging area of environmental psychology is showing how direct exposure to nature positively affects social development, physical health, mental well-being, and learning. Patrick Owen will present data demonstrating that students learn as effectively and have more positive attitudes toward learning when instruction takes place in a natural environment. Kathleen Fuegen will describe the effects of natural environments and exercise on measures of affect (emotional state).

RESEARCH PRESENTED BY:

Patrick C. Owen PhD
(Biology Department, University of Cincinnati, Blue Ash College)

Kathleen A. Fuegen PhD
(Department of Psychological Science, Northern Kentucky University)

ABOUT UC BLUE ASH COLLEGE

UC Blue Ash College is a regional college within the University of Cincinnati. It offers one of the best values in higher education with access to a nationally recognized UC education in nearly 50 degrees and certificates, as well as tuition that is about half of most colleges and universities. The college is located on a scenic 135-acre wooded campus in the heart of Blue Ash, Ohio.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

SKINNY BITCH COLLECTIVE: WHERE MODELS GO TO GET IN SHAPE

Skinny Bitch Collective: Where Models Go to Get in Shape
“Champion: Christy Turlington” photographed by Michael Thompson, styled by Camilla Nickerson; W Magazine August 2008.

Skinny Bitch Collective: Where Models Go to Get in Shape

A new invitation-only fitness phenomenon is helping models and It girls make their fit figures even stronger. One writer tries out the extreme workout.

  • May 10, 2016 12:52 PM | by Vanessa Lawrence
On a recent weekend afternoon, I found myself in a sun-filled studio in the Flatiron neighborhood of New York, holding hands in a circle with a group of women I had met mere minutes earlier. Dressed almost uniformly in head-to-toe black, our palms clammy, sweaty faces glistening, we closed our eyes, rose onto our toes and gyrated our hips in clockwise unison as a tribal beat shook the floorboards and a booming male voice yelled out militant directives.

No, I hadn’t joined a cult. Rather, I was being inducted into the Skinny Bitch Collective (SBC), an exclusive British fitness phenomenon with, well, a cult-like following. Founded by Russell Bateman, a trainer who previously worked with athletes and private clients in the tony Mayfair area of London, the invitation- and female-only classes have become a favorite among models and trim celebrities like Suki Waterhouse, Ellie Goulding and Nicole Scherzinger thanks to their mix of unorthodox movements and high intensity. As Bateman puts it, “The hype is such that people even lie and say they do the class when I’ve never seen them.” (The SBC Instagram handle has almost 100,000 followers.)

3 SBC musketeers. @galagordon @sukiwaterhouse @saraellaozbek. What a tune, too! #SBC

A video posted by THE SKINNY BITCH COLLECTIVE (@russellsbc) on Feb 1, 2014 at 7:36am PST

Oh, and that provocative (or infuriating, depending on your point of reference) name?

“Someone said to me, ‘Where are the skinny bitches today?’ And it resonated in my head. I liked the word ‘collective’ and glued that together,” explains Bateman. “Friends hated it and told me it was offensive, but I trusted myself and my foresight to go with something I knew would get attention.”

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Such foresight has certainly paid off. In a crowded exercise landscape where anyone with time, funds and motivation can find a plethora of options to feed their physical upward mobility desires (bouldering? Pilates on a chair-cum-torture device? Spinning to the Hamilton soundtrack?), SBC sets itself apart not only with its content—more on that later—but its ethos: money can’t buy this class or the ass that, theoretically, comes with it. And less-fit mortals need not apply.

“There’s nothing interesting for me about making someone who’s overweight a little bit less overweight. The challenge is getting someone who already looks great into epic shape. I’m not about normal,” says Bateman. “In London, we have a class that’s like a well-oiled machine, an army or sorority of strong, lean women that move like animals. Some of the girls are models for Armani or Burberry, but regardless, they can ‘dance’ to the SBC beat and that’s what matters.”

I’ve never modeled and my dancing skills are atrocious, so needless to say, I was rather apprehensive as I made my way up the stairs to the Bandier studio, site of Bateman’s SBC New York pop-up space.

“You’re here for the influencer class?” queried the sign-in woman, before banishing me to a mezzanine for being too early (a quick peek into the studio confirmed a modelesque figure sitting in the otherwise empty studio, not the mezzanine).

Ensconced on a sofa in a barely lit waiting area, I watched as long-legged women in black leggings and Alpha Industries MA-1 Flight jackets made their way up the stairs. Once allowed entry to the studio, I stripped down to a tank as next to me, a tall, glowing brunette blithely ripped off her top, revealing a bright pink sports bra and concave abdomen.

Toto, we were not in Equinox anymore.

“Girls get nervous before they do SBC: it’s like that third date where you might just get lucky, however you never know what’s gonna happen,” says Bateman. “When you come to an SBC class, you never know what’s going to happen. The blueprint is in my mind, so I can constantly keep people guessing.”

With barely a moment to compose ourselves, Bateman, a slim, wiry man dressed in all grey, not unlike a trainer by way of a dystopian cinematic franchise, instructed us to find a place on the wooden floor and lie down. We took some deep breaths and did some dynamic stretches as an initial warm-up. Then, we stood in a circle and per his directions, put all of our arms straight up in the air, lined up so that our palms could touch.

“I don’t want to see any of this shit!” extorted Bateman, demonstrating a slightly bent arm. “Keep them straight!”

With that, we followed his lead and began gyrating our hips clockwise and then counterclockwise, maintaining our touching hands, standing on our toes, as a slow, easy beat played.

Things picked up when we were asked, hands still touching, always touching, to jump in a wave of successive split lunges, one, after the other, screaming out our names as we did so.

“Faster, faster!” yelled Bateman. “Get lower!”

Things were becoming a little less kumbaya and a bit more kamikaze.

Then we were jumping our feet in and out as the whole circle rotated clockwise, like a twisted version of the hora, sweat already dripping off our faces.

“The beat is simple! You should be able to stay with the beat,” said Bateman, as our circle became more oblong and less syncopated.

We would return to this orb of uplifted hands many times, as if reciting a chorus to the lyrics of a one hour class.

Next came partnering up. Luckily, I happened to be standing next to a sweet—and equally petite to my 5’3 frame—young woman named Eva. We squatted down, clasped hands and began pushing our arms back and forth furiously, as Bateman yelled, “Go faster! Maintain eye contact—stare into each other’s eyes!”

I tried my best, but it felt too intimate. I was already invading her space enough by clasping sweaty palms with hers.

Once back in the circle of life, Bateman had pink sports bra girl (clearly a model, aka Chloe) demonstrate the “can-can” move, whereby, hands on the floor, hips to the ceiling we kicked our legs up and down in (you guessed it) unison. We removed our shoes so our sock-covered feet could act as natural gliders as we attempted grueling pushups into knee tucks for 30 seconds. Apparently, Eva and I fared well in this endeavor, because Bateman, much to my mortification, ordered the rest of the class to watch us “demonstrate” the move on the second go-round. Chloe did not look pleased.

“It’s okay to throw [some competition] in sometimes, just to bring out the animal side of the person,” says Bateman. “It’s the quiet ones you always have to watch out for—they are dangerous!”

Also potentially dangerous? Taking a bunch of hyped up young women and asking them to pair up and take turns punching each other in the stomach continuously. Fortunately, I was once again with Eva.

“Punch her harder!” yelled Bateman as I tapped Eva’s abs as gently as I could.

“I don’t want to hurt her!” I pleaded meekly.

“Does she look hurt?” Bateman growled back.

“It doesn’t hurt, I promise,” encouraged Eva.

This was starting to turn into Fight Club. Or perhaps more accurately, playground wars, as we were next—incredulously—piggy-backing our partners around the room, turning the studio into a kind of human bumper car ride, with multiple, girl-on-girl squared and girl-on-girl-on-wall near collisions.

A few side planks, pushups into donkey kicks (those did not go well—“Land softly, like a ninja!” extolled Bateman as a general thudding, crashing noise filled the room) and one-armed burpees later and we were racing each other across the floor, dragging ourselves on our butts using only our shoulders and triceps. There were handstand mountain climbers against the wall and then the pièce de résistance as half the class crawled around on all fours in pairs, trying to slap each other as the rest of the participants watched while in a wall sit position. The scene from Mean Girls, in which Lindsay Lohan envisions her fellow teenagers transformed into fighting African mammals came to mind.

“It’s raw, it’s evolving, it’s emotional, it’s bonding,” says Bateman of the emphasis on partnering and touching. “We are human, after all. You’ll play with each other. You’ll hold hands. You’ll smack someone’s ass. You’ll close your eyes. But you’ll never forget it. Human contact is great for your hormones—oxytocin is a cuddle hormone.”

I could have used a hug. Instead, I returned to the ring one last time for some isometric holds (clutching hands, always) before collapsing onto the ground to stretch, a collective groan of relief escaping from all but Chloe and her fellow model, Ash.

“You’ve just got to leave any ego at the door and realize you’re going to get a little fucked up doing things you’ve never conventionally done in an exercise class,” says Bateman of the SBC experience, adding, “It’s built to make a girl leave the session leaner, stronger and make them feel like they just had an orgasm.”

Was it as good for you as it was for me?

[“source-smallbiztrends”]