The Indus raga: From Bulleh Ki Jana Mein Kon to Tarrin Paunda

The Indus raga: From Bulleh Ki Jana Mein Kon to Tarrin Paunda

The Indus is one of the oldest and longest rivers in Asia. though it originated in the Tibetan Plateau in China, plenty of it flows throughout Pakistan.

Over the centuries, a wide type of cultures, languages and religions have sprung up on both aspects of the Indus.

5 thousand years from the moment the primary essential civilisation emerged alongside the Indus, untilthe creation of Pakistan in 1947, various religions and cultures have thrived here: Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Islam. every of these religions have been indigenised.

despite the fact that Islam has end up the main religion along the Indus inside the last 500 years, the dynamic history of the place has stored cultures largely heterogeneous and varied. A commonality turned into no longer attempted on the basis of a homogenous or monolithic idea of faith and way of life right here.

as an alternative the ones preaching Islam inside the areaespecially from the twelfth century onward – absorbed current cultural traditions that had evolved for heaps of years along the river, and, in turn, expressed them thru the more esoteric strands of Islam (Sufism).

traditionally, the strand of Sufism which emerged on the banks of Indus (mainly in Punjab and all themanner across Sindh), consciously eschewed spiritual orthodoxy and, at instances, even rebelled in opposition to it.

The poetry and music that emerged from Sufi circles along the river is therefore largely a end result of the theological, political and social tensions among Sufis and the orthodox ulema and clerics.

this is still the case, as we will see whilst reviewing a series of songs associated with the ancient Sufitradition alongside the Indus.one of the most 9aaf3f374c58e8c9dcdd1ebf10256fa5 poems by way of a Sufi saint within the location is Bulleh Ki Jana Mein Kon (Bulleh, to me i am unfamous).

Penned by way of the 18th century Sufi saint and poet, Bulleh Shah, for over two hundred years, it has been used as a famous deterrent towards the ‘orthodox’ ulema who have continued to be crucial of the strands of Islam that have developed (over centuries) in cultures on each facets of the Indus.

Bulleh Shah become born in Southern Punjab in 1680 and in large part preached there in the Punjabi language.

He wrote normally in Punjabi due to the fact rather than Persian (which was the language of the Muslim Mughal courtroom on the time), Punjabi turned into a ‘not unusual man’s language’. He additionallywrote in Sariki (spoken in South Punjab) and in Sindhi.

The poem is a hurtling lament towards spiritual orthodoxy wherein Shah distances himself from the layers ofnotion that organised religions are wrapped with. rather, he comes out searching out some thing which isfreed from cultural, political and non secular prejudices and perceptions.

this is how, he believes, he can discover proper humanity and therefore the Almighty. however, ultimately, he realises that by rejecting present theological, political and social labels, all he’s left with is the query of who he is.

To him, this nothingness might also as nicely be everything which humans should end up (to eschew bigotry and divisions).

The nothingness (inside the context of conventional Sufi imagery and ideas) is a seamless, almostinexplicable, void in which the presence of the Almighty can be felt. It has no room for man-made prejudices.

English translation

Bulleh, to me, i’m now not recognised

now not a believer in the mosque,

Nor a pagan of fake rites,

now not the natural amongst the impure,

Neither Moses, nor the Pharaoh…

Bulleya! to me, i am not recognized

now not in the holy Vedas am I,

Nor in opium, neither in wine,

now not within the drunkard’s intoxicated craze,

Neither conscious, nor in a snoozing daze,

Bulleya! to me, i’m not regarded

In happiness, nor in sorrow am I

Neither easy, nor a filthy mire,

not from water, nor from earth,

Neither fireplace, nor from air is my delivery.

Bulleya! To me, i am no longer recognized

no longer an Arab, nor Punjabi

Neither Hindi, nor Nagauri

Hindu, Turk, nor Peshawari,

Nor do I live in Nadaun

Bulleya! to me, i am no longer known

differences of religion, i’ve no longer regarded,

From Adam and Eve, i’m not born

i am now not the name I count on

not in stillness, nor on the flow

Bulleya! to me, i’m no longer recognized

i’m the primary, i’m the final

None different have I ever recognised

i am the wisest of all of them

Bulleh! do I stand by myself?

Bulleya! i’m no longer recognized.
every other popular kalam (poem) through Bulleh Shah is Asaan Ishq Namaz Jadoun Neeti Aye (Everconsidering that I resolved to say the prayer of love).

Written in Sariki, it is by using far his maximum pointed indictment of the complaint he acquired from the ones accusing him of ‘distorting religion’.

He directly addresses his critics and name callings them for usually looking at others and by no meansinside their personal selves. He additionally lambasts them for finding spirituality and the Almighty in books, rituals and places of worship, with out searching out Him where he truly resides i.e. in one’s heart.

He dismisses the clergy as being worthless even when in comparison to a fowl due to the fact at the least the fowl does his duty of waking up human beings (in preference to stifling them and inspiring themto stay asleep).

English translation (excerpt)

you could have study lots of books,

but have you ever read your self?

whereas they all run in the direction of mosques and temples,

They never enter their very own hearts.

Your fight in opposition to satan is futile;

because you have to first combat your personal dreams.

You searching for the one in heaven,

however you never attempt to attain the one who is living with you.

Ever considering i’ve resolved to say the prayer of love,

i have forgotten the mosque and temple.

The roosters are better than the clerics;

For at the least they wake buddies who’re asleep…

A wine-dealer is higher than a moneylender,

at the least he serves a drink to the thirsty.

Oh, Bulleh, make friends together with your critics,

before they beat you up.

Cleric, depart the ones books on my own,

You just have shallow knowledge.

You want to cleanse yourself from the wines of ardour,

Your exterior and indoors are both stained.

you still input locations of worship,

however while will you input your personal heart?
Laal Meri Pat has been round for hundreds of years. It was a poem dedicated to the 13th century Sufi saint, Lal Shahbaz Qalandar.

Lal Shahbaz was born in Afghanistan in 1149 CE. As a younger man, he studied religion under variousscholars before leaving his domestic and traveling various international locations. He eventuallyarrived and settled in Sehwan – an historical metropolis in what’s the prevailing-day province of Sindh.

Shahbaz commenced preaching a noticeably esoteric strand of Islam right here, and nearly at onceattracted devotees from the location’s Muslim and Hindu communities.

Shahbaz become a rebellion and refused to submit to the dictates of the conservative clergy. He mastereddiverse languages, which includes Sindhi, Pashto, Turkish, Arabic and Sanskrit.

He turned into recognized for his nonchalant and ‘possessed’ mannerisms. He died in Sehwan and becameburied there. it is also in which his shrine stands.

Amir Khusro (a poet and scholar within the court docket of India’s 14th century Delhi Sultanate), after being moved by way of the tales of Lal Shahbaz, wrote a poem celebrating the life of the saint.

18th century Sufi saints, Bulleh Shah and Waris Shah (from Punjab), introduced a few verses to Khusro’s poem. with the aid of the nineteenth century, roving fakirs (non secular vagabonds) had been making a song it outside the shrine of Lal Shahbaz.

Sung in Punjabi, the poem/track, though already 9aaf3f374c58e8c9dcdd1ebf10256fa5 in Punjab and Sindh,become given a more mainstream make-over inside the Sixties by using composer, master Ashiq Hussain.

The words of the track have been updated by way of the tragic poet, Saghar Siddiqui, earlier than it wasoffered to well-wellfamous Pakistani vocalist, Noor Jahan to sing.

It turned into this version of the track which have become the maximum famous; and a cutting-edgeelement of Punjab’s folks tune realm. Later, it became blanketed by means of various well-knownsingers of both Pakistan and India.

The tune is a whirling tribute to Lal Shahbaz Qalandar. it’s miles frequently sung with reckless abandon, as if in a trance, and to the beat of the South Asian Sufi song genre called the dhamal.

The song is a particular preferred of the saint’s ladies devotees, who mostly belong to the running classand peasant communities of Punjab and Sindh, and discover the words and music fantastically liberatingand healing.

Oh Laal, please hold my topics instantly;

long live Laal!

From Sindh and of Sehwan,

Comes the beneficiant Shahbaz Qalandar …

In every step, I alternate the path of Qalandar;

Ali (RA) is in my every breath…

four of your lamps burn for all time,

i’ve come to burn a 5th one;

long live Laal!

Oh my mentor, your shrine is high,

Songs are played in sync with the clocks…

long live Laal!

Ghanan Ghanan(!) is the sound of your drum,

The clocks tick in conjunction with it…

lengthy stay Laal…!

14th century poet, Amir Khusro used elements from ancient Persian, Arabic, Turkish and Indian tune to create a distinct tune style referred to as the qawaali. The qawaali speedy became attached to the songdone at Sufi shrines in India.

by the 16th century, the qawaali had advanced into a bona fide Sufi devotional song shape, wherein odes to the Almighty and divine Muslim personalities were sung to the beat of rhythmic and hypnotic beats.

until the mid-twentieth century, Qawaali remained constrained to Sufi shrines inside the Punjab and in a few other regions of South Asia.

but, from the past due 1950s onward, it became introduced to a much broader urban audience in Pakistan by using qawaali singers (qawaals) inclusive of the Sabri Brothers and Aziz Mian.

One manner they did this was by delivering their qawaalis in Urdu. This become additionally while the Sabri Brothers and Aziz Mian integrated cutting-edge poetry, however which become introduced inside the installed imagery and ethos of the conventional qawaali.

for instance, Aziz Mian could often cope with present day-day issues through Sufi idioms and conceptsfirst developed within the poetry and songs of ancient Sufi poets of the vicinity.

One such idiom turned into of the inner warfare a Sufi poet often experienced in his try to achieve a unique harmony with God. in the method, he annihilates (fana) his ego which continues a personanchored to the trivia of normal existence.

The union with God (a metaphor for a clean know-how and cognizance of His lifestyles) changed intodefined as an intoxicated nation which the Sufi poets likened with the outcomes of candy wine.

but, the union in this context changed into now not the cease of it. due to the fact after turning intostrikingly aware about God’s presence, many Sufi poets might still find Him to be difficult and unable to becompletely grasped by means of the constrained capacities of the human thoughts.

that is whilst many poets would stretch their poems and flip them into imagined conversations with the Almighty, exposing their conflicting feelings made of awe as well as anger; ecstasy in addition todesolation.

Aziz Mian mastered this thing of the qawaali. however his frustration became greater to do with hisimmediate surroundings in which he become regularly criticised for being violent and too admiring of intoxicants, specially alcohol.

In 1975, whilst the Sabri Brothers mocked his ‘invariably intoxicated state’, and fashion of qawaali, Aziz Mian retaliated by way of penning an extended qawaali which sardonically hit returned at his critics.

This turned into Haye kambakht tu ne pi hi nahi (Oh, unfortunate soul, you by no means even drank). In it, he starts offevolved by using proudly proudly owning up to his liking for intoxicants, taunting hiscombatants that they had been criticising something that they had in no way even experienced.

He then actions on via suggesting that those who like delivering lectures on morals and neverthelessdedicate misdeeds had been worse than drunkards, and therefore had been hypocrites.

as the qawaali goes deeper toward a whirling climax, Aziz Mian shows that he was intoxicated by using his love of the Almighty; an intoxication which his detractors can’t even believe or achieve because they have been shallow. He damns them for being myopic and simplistic of their expertise of his words.
one of the most extreme examples of a Sufi poem which offers with the conflict and frustration of a personwho is left at a loss for words by using God even after accomplishing the nation of ego annihilationbecame penned by using Naz Khialvi – a poet from the metropolis of Toba Tek Singh within the Punjab. He titled the poem Tum aik gorak dhanda ho (you’re puzzle).

within the late 1980s, Khialvi gave the poem to the well-known qawaal, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who tooknearly years to compose it the way he concept it deserved to be added.

The poem affords God as a complicated paradox, putting the poet in a nation of both awe in addition tofrustration due to the fact even after know-how a few aspects of the Almighty, the poet is baffled by the ones elements that go the alternative manner, often changing (within the seeker) euphoria with bewilderment.

The poet pleads that he has every proper to impeach the anomaly because he become completely in love with an entity which pulls him nearer, however does no longer allow itself to be fully comprehended.
Tarrin Paunda (Plant) is one of the maximum haunting songs within the massive reservoir of Sindh’sancient Sufi tune genre. It turned into first recorded by using Allan Fakir (for Radio Pakistan) within theoverdue Nineteen Seventies.

Allan changed into the quintessential Sindhi people singer, who had mastered the artwork of expressing the poetry of historical Sufi saints who had settled alongside the River Indus within the arid province of Sindh.

Tarrin Paunda is often mistaken as being the paintings of 18th century Sufi saint, Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai.however it became actually authored with the aid of Shaikh Ayaz.

As a young guy, Ayaz turned into a Marxist who went directly to grow to be a close colleague of the ‘father of Sindhi nationalism’, GM Syed (earlier than they fell out inside the Eighties).

Ayaz’s maximum prolific duration as a author and poet changed into among the early Nineteen Sixtiesand overdue Nineteen Seventies. And it changed into within the Seventies that he penned Tarrin Paunda, which become stimulated with the aid of the mesmerising poetic style of Sufi saint, Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai.

The poem is set a man’s wish to in the future meet his loved while his herbal environment can be in fullbloom.

He sings (in Sindhi):

while pink roses will bloom, then we will meet;

whilst those birds will return and we are able to make their sounds, then we are able to meet;

when the tears will circulate down the cheeks like pearls, then we are able to meet;

those days of parting were a mistake of adolescents, so we can meet whilst there are roses in bloom…’

The poem was written by means of Ayaz to be sung in a hypnotic way, as though the singer becomeblissfully stuck internal an everlasting loop of each desire and melancholy; love and despair.

Allan Fakir done that perfectly.

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The Indus is one of the oldest and longest rivers in Asia. although it originated in the Tibetan Plateau in China, an awful lot of it flows throughout Pakistan.

Over the centuries, a huge style of cultures, languages and religions have sprung up on each aspects of the Indus.

five thousand years from the moment the primary principal civilisation emerged alongside the Indus, untilthe creation of Pakistan in 1947, diverse religions and cultures have thrived here: Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Islam. every of those religions were indigenised.

despite the fact that Islam has turn out to be the primary religion along the Indus inside the final 500 years, the dynamic history of the region has kept cultures in large part heterogeneous and varied. A commonality became now not tried on the premise of a homogenous or monolithic concept of faith andway of life right here.

alternatively those preaching Islam within the vicinityspecially from the twelfth century onward – absorbed existing cultural traditions that had evolved for hundreds of years alongside the river, and, inflip, expressed them via the extra esoteric strands of Islam (Sufism).

traditionally, the strand of Sufism which emerged on the banks of Indus (specifically in Punjab and all of the way across Sindh), consciously eschewed spiritual orthodoxy and, at instances, even rebelled towardsit.

The poetry and song that emerged from Sufi circles alongside the river is consequently largely a end result of the theological, political and social tensions among Sufis and the orthodox ulema and clerics.

this is nonetheless the case, as we shall see while reviewing a chain of songs associated with thehistorical Sufi culture alongside the Indus.

Bulleh Ki Jana Mein Kon
Video: Bulleh Ki Jana by way of Sain Zahoor

Play
one of the most 9aaf3f374c58e8c9dcdd1ebf10256fa5 poems by means of a Sufi saint in the place is Bulleh Ki Jana Mein Kon (Bulleh, to me i am unwell-known).

Penned via the 18th century Sufi saint and poet, Bulleh Shah, for over two hundred years, it’s been used as a popular deterrent in opposition to the ‘orthodox’ ulema who’ve continued to be important of the strands of Islam that have developed (over centuries) in cultures on each aspects of the Indus.

Bulleh Shah was born in Southern Punjab in 1680 and largely preached there in the Punjabi language.

He wrote normally in Punjabi due to the fact as opposed to Persian (which become the language of the Muslim Mughal court at the time), Punjabi turned into a ‘not unusual guy’s language’. He additionallywrote in Sariki (spoken in South Punjab) and in Sindhi.

The poem is a hurtling lament towards spiritual orthodoxy in which Shah distances himself from the layers of belief that organised religions are wrapped with. alternatively, he comes out looking for something that is freed from cultural, political and spiritual prejudices and perceptions.

this is how, he believes, he can discover real humanity and therefore the Almighty. but, ultimately, he realises that via rejecting existing theological, political and social labels, all he’s left with is the query of whohe’s.

To him, this nothingness may also as properly be the whole lot which human beings should emerge as(to eschew bigotry and divisions).

The nothingness (in the context of traditional Sufi imagery and concepts) is a continuing, almostinexplicable, void wherein the presence of the Almighty can be felt. It has no room for man-made prejudices.

English translation

Bulleh, to me, i am now not known

now not a believer within the mosque,

Nor a pagan of fake rites,

not the natural among the impure,

Neither Moses, nor the Pharaoh…

Bulleya! to me, i am now not acknowledged

not in the holy Vedas am I,

Nor in opium, neither in wine,

not inside the drunkard’s intoxicated craze,

Neither unsleeping, nor in a napping daze,

Bulleya! to me, i’m now not acknowledged

In happiness, nor in sorrow am I

Neither smooth, nor a filthy mire,

now not from water, nor from earth,

Neither hearth, nor from air is my start.

Bulleya! To me, i am no longer regarded

not an Arab, nor Punjabi

Neither Hindi, nor Nagauri

Hindu, Turk, nor Peshawari,

Nor do I stay in Nadaun

Bulleya! to me, i am not known

variations of faith, i’ve no longer regarded,

From Adam and Eve, i’m not born

i’m not the name I count on

not in stillness, nor at the move

Bulleya! to me, i am not recognised

i’m the primary, i’m the closing

None different have I ever regarded

i’m the wisest of all of them

Bulleh! do I stand on my own?

Bulleya! i’m now not known.

Asaan Ishq Namaz Jadoun Neeti Aye
Video: Asaan Ishq Namaz Jadoun Neeti via Abida Parveen

Play
some other popular kalam (poem) by Bulleh Shah is Asaan Ishq Namaz Jadoun Neeti Aye (Ever due to the fact I resolved to mention the prayer of love).

Written in Sariki, it’s far by means of a long way his maximum pointed indictment of the criticism heacquired from those accusing him of ‘distorting faith’.

He without delay addresses his critics and scoffs them for usually looking at others and in no way withintheir own selves. He also lambasts them for locating spirituality and the Almighty in books, rituals andlocations of worship, with out seeking out Him where he virtually resides i.e. in a single’s coronary heart.

He dismisses the clergy as being nugatory even if compared to a hen due to the fact at least the roosterdoes his duty of waking up human beings (rather than stifling them and inspiring them to remain asleep).

English translation (excerpt)

you could have read heaps of books,

but have you ever study your self?

while all of them run towards mosques and temples,

They never enter their own hearts.

Your combat towards satan is futile;

due to the fact you have to first combat your own desires.

You are looking for the one in heaven,

however you in no way attempt to reach the one who is living with you.

Ever since i have resolved to say the prayer of affection,

i’ve forgotten the mosque and temple.

The roosters are higher than the clerics;

For at least they wake pals who’re asleep…

A wine-seller is higher than a moneylender,

at the least he serves a drink to the thirsty.

Oh, Bulleh, make friends with your critics,

before they beat you up.

Cleric, leave the ones books alone,

You just have shallow expertise.

You need to cleanse yourself from the wines of passion,

Your exterior and indoors are each stained.

you continue to enter places of worship,

but when will you input your very own coronary heart?

Laal Meri Pat
Video: Laal Meri Pat through Noor Jahan

Play
Laal Meri Pat has been round for centuries. It changed into a poem devoted to the thirteenth century Sufi saint, Lal Shahbaz Qalandar.

Lal Shahbaz was born in Afghanistan in 1149 CE. As a younger guy, he studied religion beneath diversepupils before leaving his domestic and traveling diverse countries. He in the end arrived and settled in Sehwan – an historical metropolis in what’s the present-day province of Sindh.

Shahbaz started preaching a particularly esoteric strand of Islam right here, and almost without delayattracted devotees from the area’s Muslim and Hindu groups.

Shahbaz changed into a revolt and refused to put up to the dictates of the conservative clergy. He masteredvarious languages, consisting of Sindhi, Pashto, Turkish, Arabic and Sanskrit.

He turned into recognized for his nonchalant and ‘possessed’ mannerisms. He died in Sehwan and becomeburied there. it’s also where his shrine stands.

Amir Khusro (a poet and scholar inside the court of India’s 14th century Delhi Sultanate), after being movedwith the aid of the stories of Lal Shahbaz, wrote a poem celebrating the life of the saint.

18th century Sufi saints, Bulleh Shah and Waris Shah (from Punjab), introduced a few verses to Khusro’s poem. through the 19th century, roving fakirs (non secular vagabonds) had been singing it out of doorsthe shrine of Lal Shahbaz.

Sung in Punjabi, the poem/song, although already 9aaf3f374c58e8c9dcdd1ebf10256fa5 in Punjab and Sindh, become given a greater mainstream make-over within the Sixties with the aid of composer, graspAshiq Hussain.

The phrases of the tune had been up to date by means of the tragic poet, Saghar Siddiqui, before itturned into presented to well-knownfamous Pakistani vocalist, Noor Jahan to sing.

It become this version of the track which have become the maximum famous; and a modern-day factor of Punjab’s people song realm. Later, it was protected by using numerous well-wellfamous singers of eachPakistan and India.

The tune is a whirling tribute to Lal Shahbaz Qalandar. it is regularly sung with reckless abandon, as if in a trance, and to the beat of the South Asian Sufi song style called the dhamal.

The music is a selected favourite of the saint’s women devotees, who on the whole belong to the workingmagnificence and peasant groups of Punjab and Sindh, and find the phrases and music particularlyfreeing and recuperation.

Oh Laal, please hold my subjects immediately;

long stay Laal!

From Sindh and of Sehwan,

Comes the generous Shahbaz Qalandar …

In every step, I change the route of Qalandar;

Ali (RA) is in my each breath…

four of your lamps burn for all time,

i’ve come to burn a fifth one;

lengthy live Laal!

Oh my mentor, your shrine is high,

Songs are performed in sync with the clocks…

lengthy stay Laal!

Ghanan Ghanan(!) is the sound of your drum,

The clocks tick at the side of it…

long stay Laal…!

Haye Kambakht tu Ney Pi hello Nahi & Tum Aik Ghorak Dhanda Ho
Audio: Haye Kambakht through Aziz Mian

14th century poet, Amir Khusro used elements from historic Persian, Arabic, Turkish and Indian song to create a wonderful tune style referred to as the qawaali. The qawaali quickly became attached to thetrack carried out at Sufi shrines in India.

with the aid of the 16th century, the qawaali had developed into a bona fide Sufi devotional music form, in which odes to the Almighty and divine Muslim personalities have been sung to the beat of rhythmic and hypnotic beats.

till the mid-twentieth century, Qawaali remained restrained to Sufi shrines in the Punjab and in a fewdifferent areas of South Asia.

but, from the past due Fifties onward, it became added to a much wider city audience in Pakistan by way of qawaali singers (qawaals) along with the Sabri Brothers and Aziz Mian.

One way they did this become via delivering their qawaalis in Urdu. This become also whilst the Sabri Brothers and Aziz Mian included modern poetry, however which was added inside the set up imagery and ethos of the conventional qawaali.

as an example, Aziz Mian could often address modern-day problems through Sufi idioms and conceptsfirst evolved within the poetry and songs of historical Sufi poets of the location.

One such idiom become of the internal battle a Sufi poet frequently experienced in his try to attain a completely unique team spirit with God. within the technique, he annihilates (fana) his ego whichcontinues someone anchored to the trivialities of ordinary life.

The union with God (a metaphor for a clear know-how and focus of His existence) became explained as an intoxicated state which the Sufi poets likened with the consequences of candy wine.

however, the union on this context changed into no longer the quit of it. due to the fact after becomingstrikingly aware about God’s presence, many Sufi poets might nonetheless discover Him to becomplicated and not able to be absolutely grasped via the confined capacities of the human thoughts.

that is when many poets would stretch their poems and flip them into imagined conversations with the Almighty, exposing their conflicting feelings made from awe in addition to anger; ecstasy as well asdesolation.

Aziz Mian mastered this issue of the qawaali. but his frustration turned into more to do together with hisinstant environment in which he become frequently criticised for being violent and too admiring of intoxicants, specifically alcohol.

In 1975, whilst the Sabri Brothers mocked his ‘always intoxicated nation’, and style of qawaali, Aziz Mian retaliated via penning a protracted qawaali which sardonically hit again at his critics.

This turned into Haye kambakht tu ne pi hello nahi (Oh, unfortunate soul, you never even drank). In it, hestarts by using proudly owning as much as his liking for intoxicants, taunting his fighters that they had been criticising something they had by no means even skilled.

He then movements on by using suggesting that people who like handing over lectures on morals andstill dedicate misdeeds were worse than drunkards, and accordingly had been hypocrites.

because the qawaali goes deeper in the direction of a whirling climax, Aziz Mian shows that he becameintoxicated by way of his love of the Almighty; an intoxication which his detractors can’t even believe orobtain because they were shallow. He damns them for being myopic and simplistic in their information of his phrases.

Video: Gorak Dhanda (with English translation) via Nusrat Fateh Ali

Play
one of the most extreme examples of a Sufi poem which deals with the battle and frustration of a personwho’s left at a loss for words by using God even after reaching the nation of ego annihilation turned intopenned with the aid of Naz Khialvi – a poet from the city of Toba Tek Singh in the Punjab. He titled the poem Tum aik gorak dhanda ho (you are puzzle).

inside the late Nineteen Eighties, Khialvi gave the poem to the well-known qawaal, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who took nearly years to compose it the way he notion it deserved to be added.

The poem affords God as a perplexing paradox, placing the poet in a country of both awe in addition tofrustration because even after knowledge some elements of the Almighty, the poet is baffled by using the ones factors that pass the other way, regularly replacing (in the seeker) euphoria with bewilderment.

The poet pleads that he has every right to question the anomaly because he become completely in love with an entity which draws him nearer, however does now not permit itself to be completelycomprehended.

Tarrin Paunda
Video: Tarrin Paunda by using Allan Fakir

Play
Tarrin Paunda (Plant) is one of the most haunting songs inside the sizeable reservoir of Sindh’s ancientSufi song genre. It become first recorded by using Allan Fakir (for Radio Pakistan) within the past dueNineteen Seventies.

Allan changed into the vital Sindhi folk singer, who had mastered the art of expressing the poetry ofhistorical Sufi saints who had settled alongside the River Indus within the arid province of Sindh.

Tarrin Paunda is regularly unsuitable as being the work of 18th century Sufi saint, Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai.but it become absolutely authored through Shaikh Ayaz.

As a younger guy, Ayaz was a Marxist who went directly to grow to be a close colleague of the ‘father of Sindhi nationalism’, GM Syed (earlier than they fell out within the 1980s).

Ayaz’s maximum prolific duration as a creator and poet become between the early 1960s and past due1970s. And it become in the 1970s that he penned Tarrin Paunda, which was inspired via the mesmerising poetic style of Sufi saint, Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai.

The poem is about a man’s desire to sooner or later meet his liked when his natural environment may bein complete bloom.

He sings (in Sindhi):

while red roses will bloom, then we will meet;

whilst those birds will go back and we are able to make their sounds, then we can meet;

while the tears will pass down the cheeks like pearls, then we can meet;

those days of parting had been a mistake of teens, so we will meet when there are roses in bloom…’

The poem turned into written through Ayaz to be sung in a hypnotic way, as if the singer was blissfullycaught inner an eternal loop of both desire and depression; love and melancholy.

Allan Fakir executed that completely.

Ya Qurban
Video: Ya Qurban with the aid of Zarsanga

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inside the north along the River Indus, Sufism did now not have the form of effect that it had inside thePunjab and Sindh. however it was nevertheless present there in a slightly distinct and more earthly form.

as an instance, concerning Sufi music and poetry, poets in Sindh and Punjab saw Indus as a fluid mystical pathway which carried males and females towards an esoteric realm, whereas inside the north, or moreso, in what is now KP, poets noticed the river as a blessed supply of nature that replenished the land on which people cultivated their vegetation, grazed their farm animals and moved backward and forward as tribes.

That’s why poetry on Pashtun folk culture is often about a beloved land and/or the reminiscence of itthrough people who needed to go away it because of various financial or political reasons.

some of the most shifting poems/songs on this admire had been written by roving Pashtun gypsies,certainly one of whom went on to grow to be a singing legend.

Pashtu people singer, Zarsanga turned into born in 1946 into a nomadic tribe in Lakki Marwat in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The tribe’s essential vocation became singing, so Zarsanga began to sing at an early age.

She would tour along with her tribe throughout Pakistan, or even to Afghanistan, where the tribe mightsettle within the summers. by the time she were given married in 1965 at the age of 19, she becamealready a famous singer most of the Pakhtuns of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

maximum of the songs that she sang were written via the commonplace humans of her nomadic tribe. The songs spoke approximately the thrill and tragedies of the lives of Pakhtun gypsies.

The non-Pashto sections of the united states of america located her when she started to document songs for Radio Pakistan in the overdue 1960s and early Seventies.

One such track, ‘Ya Qurban’, became frequently played by using the station. It was penned through a fellow gypsy (within the Sixties), and is a yearning for the stretch of land on which gypsy tribes moved from side to side, and for those who have travelled a ways faraway from these lands and their cherished ones.

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