Pippa’s fashionable pre-wedding diet – what is SirtFoods and is it healthy?

Image result for Pippa's fashionable pre-wedding diet - what is SirtFoods and is it healthy?In case you’ve missed it, Pippa Middleton is to marry fiancé James Matthews on May 20 at the historic St Mark’s Church in Englefield, Berkshire.

According to E! News the bride-to-be, already known for her active and outdoorsy lifestyle, is combining her pre-wedding prep of pilates classes with the SirtFoods diet, which also counts singer Adele and model Jodie Kidd as fans.

Developed by British nutritionists Aidan Goggins and Glen Matten, the eating plan has been implemented at the restaurant at the KX gym, the swish member’s facility Pippa has been snapped leaving in recent weeks and where Matten is resident nutritionist.

Promising both weight loss and increased energy, it already has swathes swooning over it as chocolate and red wine are allowed.

READ MORE:
*Your wedding day: what exactly should you eat?
*Diet trends through the ages and why fads don’t work
*Seven surprising dangers of fad dieting

 

Active and outdoorsy Pippa is undertaking pilates classes and a fashionable new diet in preparation for her big day.

ANTHONY HARVEY

Active and outdoorsy Pippa is undertaking pilates classes and a fashionable new diet in preparation for her big day.

There are 20 “SirtFoods”, foods which “might interact with a family of proteins known as sirtuin proteins, or SIRT1 – SIRT7,” according to academic research-based news site The Conversation, such as walnuts, kale (of course, kale), and blueberries, a well-known superfood.

As with most diets that rapidly gain popularity, it has a restrictive calorie intake, with the “first phase” being an initial seven-day period which permits only 1000 calories per day for the first three days, consumed through juices and a meal. The rest of the week, intake is raised to 1500 calories.

The “second phase” then allows you to eat a balanced diet of three daily meals, loaded with “sirtFoods”.

Consumption of superfoods, such as blueberries, are encouraged.

123RF

Consumption of superfoods, such as blueberries, are encouraged.

But does it work? Dr Rachael McLean, senior lecturer in public health at the Department of Preventive & Social Medicine at the University of Otago is sceptical.

“The stated benefits seem to be, at best, theoretical and not proven,” says McLean.

“It seems to me to be yet another fad diet, with weight loss benefits associated with substantial energy restriction.

“Experience shows that the more restrictive a diet is, the more likely it is that followers consume less energy, and so weight loss can be impressive in the short term.

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